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Genghis Khan Exhibit at Irving Center this Summer

by Stephanie Suesan Smith on June 13, 2011

 

Genghis Khan.  The very name is synonymous with terrifying conquest in Europe.  In Asia, and especially Mongolia, however, Genghis Khan is revered.  It turns out that Khan instituted some things that are still innovative today.  The Genghis Khan Exhibit at the Irving Center this summer showcases both sides of this complex man.

Mongolian Bow and Arrow In 25 years, Khan conquered more land than the Romans conquered in 400 years.  While the Europeans who were conquered were terrorized, the Asians fared better.  Khan took small countries and built them into large ones.  In some cases, these boundaries still stand.

Further, Khan installed rule by law in his conquests.  Passports, international boundaries, and the postal system were just some of the things he set up that we still use.  He also patronized the arts.  Not bad for someone we regard as a barbarian.

The exhibit is open through September 30.  Many of these items are from private collections and will not be available after this exhibit leaves.  If you are interested in 13th century Mongolian history, this is a must see event.  This is, according to the Irving Center, the largest gathering of such artifacts ever.

The exhibit is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m.  The last ticket is sold at 6:30 p.m. each day.  Parking is free.  However, this is what the tickets will cost:

  • Adults $12
  • Art Connection Members $8
  • Children (Under 18 years) $8
  • Seniors (55+ years) $8
  • K-12 Groups $5
  • Groups (12 or more) $8

The Irving Arts Center is located at  3333 N. MacArthur Blvd, Irving, TX 75062.  You can obtain more information and see some photographs of some of the artifacts at www.KhanIrving.com.  Come find out why Genghis Khan, who could be very brutal, is so revered in Mongolia.  You will be surprised at the side of Khan Europeans rarely saw.

 

FCC Disclosure:  I was paid a small sum for this post and given tickets to see the Exhibit.  My opinions are my own and I would have gone to see it anyway.

 

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{ 4 comments… read them below or add one }

Sonny June 13, 2011 at 1:09 pm

Genghis Khan seems to be a classic example of the person referenced in the saying, “One man’s marauder is another man’s freedom fighter.” Not only just in Europe, but in Western society in general, I don’t believe history books portray him in a very favorable light. The same can’t be said about his legacy in the Far East…
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Stephanie Suesan Smith June 13, 2011 at 2:19 pm

This is true. I hope to discover more about his legacy in the East at this exhibit.

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Katherine from Master Plumbers June 14, 2011 at 8:16 pm

Genghis Khan does seem to be vieled in a bit of mystery. When you hear the name you automatically think of a ruthless barbarian…but why? I found out recently that he was grandfather of the somewhat benevolent Kublai Khan. He is certainly an interesting figure and this would be a phenomenal exhibit to attend.

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Stephanie Suesan Smith June 15, 2011 at 5:59 am

Kublai Khan came close to running over Europe. The only thing that stopped him was the death of the ruling Khan, which meant he had to come home. He may have been benevolent compared to some, but both figures could be ruthless as well as innovative and benevolent.

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